How to Create Your Own Vision Board

| February 20, 2013 | 6 Comments

vision board

I remember the first time I heard about vision boards (also known as dream boards). A childhood friend of mine mentioned creating a new one because she’d totally rocked her last one. At first, I was skeptical. But soon, I found myself creating one myself. A few months later, I realized that I had accomplished much from that first one. So I created a new one. That time, the ideas on my vision board became real in a fast and furious manner. I was blown away.

Especially when I was offered an amazing trip that had been mentioned on the board. Although I declined for personal reasons, I realized that vision boards are really a powerful technique in going after ones dreams.

It’s been awhile since I created a new one though. So this week, I pulled out my supplies and created a fresh new one, taking into account what I have learned about vision boards in the past — and what I want going forward.

Vision Board

First, you need to gather your supplies. Old magazines, a piece of poster board or thick card stock, scissors and glue. I also printed out some words I wanted to include. And I used a Sharpie to make the thoughts really specific.

vision board

Then I got to work. I started making a quick list of goals. Then I went through the magazines, cutting out pictures and phrases that appealed to me and spoke to those goals. I cut more than I would need so that I could pick and choose when arranging them.

vision board

In arranging my pictures, I created a collage for the background, using images that represented the major themes of my goals — a seaside home, a successful freelancing business, etc.  Then I used the words to really hone in on the ideas and goals. Finally, I supplemented with clarifying words that I wrote on with the Sharpie.

I think this is my very favorite vision board ever. It really embodies everything I want right now.
Sarah Caron Vision Board

Want to create your own vision board? These tips will help you create a really effective one:

Be Literal on Your Vision Board

No, really. It’s funny how well they work — but sometimes not as you’d expect. My last board was all about the beach, enjoying life and cooking … and it worked. We spent a lovely summer at the beach, playing in the sand and having fun. I negotiated some great new deals too. But when I created it, I really meant to have it be a reminder of my major goal of buying a seaside home. Whoops.

Turner experienced something similar. “I put a photo of a vase full of flowers on one board I created to signify my interest in having a flower garden. What I got a few weeks later was a vase of flowers that matched almost exactly that photo. I couldn’t help but laugh when I realized what I had attracted into my life,” says Marcia Layton Turner, author of The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Vision Boards, shared these tips to creating and using them..

The solution? Be really specific. “I guess the first thing is to realize that vision boards are a tool for sharpening your focus on what it is you really want. So whatever you put on your board, your brain will interpret as what you literally want,” says Turner. “Also, be careful what you wish for. If you’re not sure about a particular goal, don’t put it on your board. Your vision board helps focus your attention, so don’t waste it on something you’re not sure you even want.”

Make it Work for You

There is simply no right or wrong in creating a vision board. What there is, however, is what speaks to you. So design yours however speaks to you — using whatever materials you like. This is truly all about you — right down to the scope of the board. “In designing your board, you can either create a board that encompasses all the aspects of your life you’re working on changing, from relationships to career to finances to health and more, or you can create separate boards for each part of your life. Whatever speaks to you is what you should use,” says Turner.

Keep it Visible

Part of having a vision board is being able to see it so that it acts as a guiding force. And a lot of the power of this is subconscious. So you want to keep your vision board in a highly visible place. Mine, for instance, is propped up on top of my desk so whenever I raise my eyes, it’s the first thing I see.”Place your completed board where you will see it regularly. On your desk or the wall you face, or in your bedroom or bathroom are common places people put their boards,” says Turner.

vision board

Refresh and Renew When You Need To

I mentioned that I am on my third vision board now. As you succeed at items on your vision board, make new boards so that you can keep your goals and plans fresh. “Make sure your vision board represents what you are currently trying to achieve for yourself. If your goals have changed, or you’ve already achieved some items, create a new board for maximum effectiveness,” says Turner.

Submitted to:

Tags: ,

Category: Being a Writer, Going After Her Dream, Writing

About the Author ()

Sarah W. Caron is a freelance writer, editor and recipe developer. She lives in Connecticut with her two kids, husband and two beagles. And she loves the beach, writing and good books ...

Comments (6)

Trackback URL | Comments RSS Feed

  1. Our mood/vision boards line up perfectly with each-others..I can just steal yours! Ha! Love your taste.

    • Sarah W. Caron says:

      Thank you, Christina!! This is by far my favorite one I’ve made — it makes me happy everything I look at it.

  2. Debbie says:

    Thank you for showing this, I’ve never heard of a vision board before! I’ve pinned this so I can try it in the future. Love it!
    Debbie :)

  3. Such wonderful and practical tips ~ thanks so much for sharing at Project Inspire{d} ~ have a week filled with JOY!

    Hugs, Mary Beth

  4. This would be such a great thing to do with kids too, especially the ones that are real idea/visionary kind of kids. A couple of mine would really love to do this!

Leave a Reply